Safari and Firefox Cache Preferences

I have a MacBook Pro, and I’m always trying to keep it running the best that it can.  Most of the time, the trouble I have is related to the amount of space Safari and Firefox use to store files in the cache.  If you would like to limit Safari’s space on your hard disk, you are kind of stuck as far as the options in the file menu’s “Reset Safari”  go.

In order to reset ( or clear ) your cache, history, cookies, etc., you can easily do this by clicking Safari in the menu bar, and either selecting just “Empty Cache” or “Reset Safari” from the drop-down menu.  There is a lot of options in Reset Safari, and you can partially clear certain things as you like.

You may also be interested in limiting the actual size of the cache, of which you have but one option–WebPreview, or CoverFlow.  You can check here for instructions on how to disable that feature. Unfortunately, there is no option in Preferences to limit the cache size of Safari, or if there is I couldn’t find it.  There is a cryptic “database size” option in the advanced section of preferences, and I am trying to find out from Apple what that is in reference to (as I have none listed in the box.) The “Database Size” in the advanced section of Preferences has been an option to JavaScript developers to store code client-side rather than server-side as a way to avoid code getting trashed by storing it with a user’s cookies.  Unfortunately, after my call with Apple, there is no way to limit the size of the Cache.db file yourself (from Apple directly.)  They did mention that there “may be a third party”  application out there that could do this for me, of which I will have to scour the intrawebs to find.  My cache.db is 180MB after only two days of having cleared it.  Bummer.

Firefox, on the other hand, does give you the option to limit the cache size in Preferences –> Advanced –> Network:

Firefox Preferences

Firefox Preferences

This is nice to have, and the default is a modest 50MB.  I’ve had Safari’s WebPreview images top 500MB, which is just out of hand.

Firefox also has the ability to start sessions and save information as you’d like, found under Preferences–>Security:

Custom Security Settings

Custom Security Settings

Private Browsing Option

Private Browsing Option

The private browsing feature should show in your window’s title bar letting you know it is activated.  With this feature enabled, you just aren’t saving anything to your cache, history etc.  You are not surfing the web anonymously, however, so don’t do things you wouldn’t normally do!